Catálogo CEIBA de la Biblioteca Central de FAUBA


Integrated weed management for sustainable agriculture (Registro nro. 45790)

000 -CABECERA
campo de control de longitud fija nam a22 7a 4500
001 - NÚMERO DE CONTROL
campo de control 20180807110428.0
003 - IDENTIFICADOR DEL NÚMERO DE CONTROL
campo de control AR-BaUFA
005 - FECHA Y HORA DE LA ÚLTIMA TRANSACCIÓN
campo de control 20180814142937.0
008 - DATOS DE LONGITUD FIJA--INFORMACIÓN GENERAL
campo de control de longitud fija 100223t2018 xxkdo||| |||| 00| 0 eng d
020 ## - NÚMERO INTERNACIONAL ESTÁNDAR DEL LIBRO
Número Internacional Estándar del Libro 9781786761644
040 ## - FUENTE DE LA CATALOGACIÓN
Centro catalogador/agencia de origen AR-BaUFA
090 ## - LOCALMENTE ASIGNADO TIPO-LC NÚMERO DE CLASIFICACIÓN (OCLC); NÚMERO DE CLASIFICACIÓN LOCAL (RLIN)
Número de clasificación (OCLC) (R) ; Numero de clasificación, CALL (RLIN) (NR) 632.5 INT
245 10 - MENCIÓN DE TÍTULO
Título Integrated weed management for sustainable agriculture
260 ## - PUBLICACIÓN, DISTRIBUCIÓN, ETC.
Lugar de publicación, distribución, etc. Cambridge
Nombre del editor, distribuidor, etc. Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing
Fecha de publicación, distribución, etc. 2018
300 ## - DESCRIPCIÓN FÍSICA
Extensión 453 p.
Otras características físicas tbls., grafs., fot.
490 ## - MENCIÓN DE SERIE
Mención de serie Burleigh Dodds series in agricultural sciece
Designación de volumen o secuencia 42
500 ## - NOTA GENERAL
Nota general Contents
Preface
Introduction
Part 1 : Weeds
Weed ecology and population dynamics
Adam S. Davis, USDA-ARS, USA
Introduction
Populations: abundance
Populations: weed distribution
Target transitions: a quantitative approach to targeting weed life stages
Communities in arable systems
Agroecosystems
Case study: mitigating the invasive potential of a bioenergy crop species
Summary and future trends
Where to look for further information
References
Weed-plant interactions
Bruce Maxwell, Montana State University, USA
Introduction
Crop-weed interactions: an evolutionary perspective
The nature of shared resource pools
Direct competition for resources
Indirect effects of competition
Spatial and temporal dynamics
Conclusion
Where to look for further information
References
Invasive weed species and their effects
David R. Clements, Trinity Western University, Canada
Introduction
What is an invasive weed?
The invasion process
Economic effects on agricultural commodities
Indirect effects
Globalization and climate change effects
Applying IWM
Conclusion
Where to look for further information
References
Contents
Part 2 : IWM principles
Key issues and challenges of integrated weed management
C. J. Swanton and T. Valente, University of Guelph, Canada
Introduction
Tillage
Time of weed emergence relative to the crop
Critical periods for weed control
Crop morphology
Row width and seeding density to reduce weed competitiveness
Nutrient management
Crop rotation
Future trends and conclusion
Where to look for further information
References
Ethical issues in integrated weed management
Robert L. Zimdahl, Colorado State University, USA
Introduction
Ethical principles
Ethics in agriculture
Sustainability as an ethical goal
Conclusion
Where to look for further information
References
Surveillance and monitoring of weed populations
Anita Dille, Kansas State University, USA
Introduction
Temporal and spatial variation
Monitoring weed populations
Case studies: how research has been used to improve practice
Summary and future trends
Where to look for further information
References
Part 3 : Using herbicides in IWM
Site-specific weed management
S.A. Clay and S.A. Bruggeman, South Dakota State University, USA
Introduction Site-specific weed management
Weed variability and its influence on weed management
Field scouting: measuring spatial and temporal variabilities of weeds
Other sensing methods and controlling weeds based on
spatial variability
Results, interpretation and management decisions
Summary
Future trends in research
Where to look for further information
References
Assessing and minimizing the environmental effects of herbicides
Christopher Preston, University of Adelaide, Australia
Introduction
Sources and fate of herbicides in the environment
Environmental effects of herbicides
Managing environmental effects of herbicides
Future trends and conclusion
Where to look for further information
References
Trends in the development of herbicide-resistant weeds
Ian Heap, International Survey of Herbicide-Resistant Weeds, USA
Introduction
Herbicide resistance definitions
Resistant weeds by site of action
Resistant weeds by crop, region and weed family
Management of herbicide-resistant weeds
Future outlook on herbicide resistance
Conclusion
Where to look for further information
References
Part 4 : Cultural and physical methods for weed control
The role of herbicide-resistant crops in integrated weed management
Prashant Jha, Montana State University, USA; and Krishna N. Reddy, USDA-ARS, USA
Introduction
Glyphosate-resistant crops
Glufosinate-resistant crops
Imidazolinone and sulphonylurea-tolerant crops
New HR crop technologies
HR crops as part of an IWM programme
Summary
Where to find further information
References
Cultural techniques to manage weeds
Matt Liebman, Iowa State University, USA
Introduction
Crop population density
Crop spatial arrangement
Sowing time and transplanting
Choice of crop genotype and breeding for competitive and
allelopathic abilities
Mulching
Soil fertility management
Irrigation and flooding: depth, timing and placement
Effects of combining multiple practices: examples of ‘many little
hammers’ at work
Future trends in research
Summary
Where to look for further information
References
The use of rotations and cover crops to manage weeds
John R. Teasdale, USDA-ARS, USA
Introduction
Crop rotation in weed management
Cover crops in weed management
Opportunities for weed establishment within rotations
Conclusion
Future trends
Where to look for further information
References
Developments in physical weed control
Eric R. Gallandt, University of Maine, USA; Daniel Brainard, Michigan State
University, USA; and Bryan Brown, University of Maine, USA
Introduction
Tillage
Physical weed control: overview
Tools, weeds and soil conditions
Weed–crop selectivity
Fundamental problems with cultivation
Future research priorities
Where to look for further information
References
Flame weeding techniques
Stevan Z. Knezevic, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
Introduction
Flaming specifications, effectiveness and equipmen
Weed response to heat
Uses of flame weeding
Advantages, disadvantages and environmental impacts
Future research and practical recommendations
Where to look for further information
References
Soil solarization: a sustainable method for weed management
Baruch Rubin, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; and Abraham
Gamliel, The Volcani Center, Israel
Introduction
Solarization: mode of action, effect on weeds, benefits and limitations
Plastic mulching technologies
Effects of solarization on soil nutrients and pesticides
Solarization and integrated pest management
Recent applications of organic amendments and solarization in weed control
Concluding remarks
Where to look for further information
References
Weed management in organic crop cultivation
Greta Gramig, North Dakota State University, USA
Introduction
Tools and tactics used in organic systems
Farmer case studies
Future trends and conclusion
Where to look for further information
References
Part 5 : Biological methods for weed control
The use of allelopathy and competitive crop cultivars for weed
suppression in cereal crops
James M. Mwendwa, Charles Sturt University, Australia; Jeffrey D.
Weidenhamer, Ashland University, USA; and Leslie A. Weston, Charles
Sturt University, Australia
Introduction: key issues and challenges
Competitive crops and cultural strategies in weed management
The effect of allelopathy on weed suppression
The effect of soil and environment on plant metabolites (allelochemicals)
Use of crop residue mulches and cover crops in weed suppression
Case studies: production of benzoxazinoids in cereal crops
Case studies: competitive cereal cultivars as a tool in integrated
weed management
Summary and future trends
Where to look for further information
References
Bioherbicides: an overview
Erin N. Rosskopf, USDA-ARS, United States Horticultural Laboratory, USA; Raghavan Charudattan, BioProdex, Inc., USA; and William Bruckart, USDA-ARS, Foreign Disease-Weed Science Research Unit, USA
Introduction
Natural products for targeting weed populations
Microbial bioherbicides and classical biological control: an overview
Examples of classical biological control
Limitations and the effects of climate change
Bioherbicides: inundative applications
Integrating bioherbicides into weed management programmes
Institutional changes for biological control adoption
Conclusion
Where to look for further information
References
The use of microorganisms in integrated weed management
Susan M. Boyetchko, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada
Introduction
The role of biopesticides
Historical accomplishments
Recent registrations
New discoveries under development
Target weed selection
Early discovery and screening
Formulation and fermentation technologies
Future trends and conclusion
Where to look for further information
References
The use of bacteria in integrated weed management
Ann C. Kennedy, USDA-ARS and Washington State University, USA
Introduction
The case of downy brome (cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum L.)
Finding a biocontrol agent to manage downy brome
Application and results
Summary
Future trends in research
Where to look for further information
References
The use of insects in integrated weed management
Sandrine Petit and David A. Bohan, UMR Agroécologie, AgroSup Dijon, INRA, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, France
Introduction
Deciphering complex interactions with generalist predator communities
Managing fields and landscapes to enhance weed seed predation
Extent of regulation
Case study: the UK national survey farm-scale evaluation
Conclusion
Future trends
Acknowledgements
Where to look for further information
References
Index
650 #0 - PUNTO DE ACCESO ADICIONAL DE MATERIA--TÉRMINO DE MATERIA
Término de materia o nombre geográfico como elemento de entrada COMPETICION VEGETAL
Fuente del encabezamiento o término Agrovoc
650 #0 - PUNTO DE ACCESO ADICIONAL DE MATERIA--TÉRMINO DE MATERIA
Término de materia o nombre geográfico como elemento de entrada MALEZAS
Fuente del encabezamiento o término Agrovoc
650 #0 - PUNTO DE ACCESO ADICIONAL DE MATERIA--TÉRMINO DE MATERIA
Término de materia o nombre geográfico como elemento de entrada PLAGAS
Fuente del encabezamiento o término Agrovoc
650 #0 - PUNTO DE ACCESO ADICIONAL DE MATERIA--TÉRMINO DE MATERIA
Término de materia o nombre geográfico como elemento de entrada ESCARDA
Fuente del encabezamiento o término Agrovoc
650 #0 - PUNTO DE ACCESO ADICIONAL DE MATERIA--TÉRMINO DE MATERIA
Término de materia o nombre geográfico como elemento de entrada CULTIVOS
Fuente del encabezamiento o término Agrovoc
650 #0 - PUNTO DE ACCESO ADICIONAL DE MATERIA--TÉRMINO DE MATERIA
Término de materia o nombre geográfico como elemento de entrada CONTROL DE PLAGAS
Fuente del encabezamiento o término Agrovoc
700 1# - PUNTO DE ACCESO ADICIONAL--NOMBRE DE PERSONA
Nombre de persona Zimdahl, Robert L.
Término indicativo de función/relación ed.
942 00 - ELEMENTOS DE PUNTO DE ACCESO ADICIONAL (KOHA)
Tipo de ítem Koha Libro de préstamo de 14 días
Existencias
Localización permanente Ubicación/localización actual Ubicación en estantería Fuente de adquisición Signatura topográfica completa Código de barras Tipo de ítem Koha
Biblioteca Central Biblioteca Central Sala de Lectura compra 2018 632.5 INT 028895 Libro de préstamo de 14 días

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