Catálogo CEIBA de la Biblioteca Central de FAUBA


Vista normal Vista MARC Vista ISBD

Modeling the response of maize phenology, kernel set, and yield components to heat stress and heat shock with CSM-IXIM

Colaborador(es): Lizaso, J. I. CEIGRAM-Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSIAAB, 28040, Madrid, Spain. jon.lizaso@upm.es | Ruiz Ramos, M. CEIGRAM-Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSIAAB, 28040, Madrid, Spain | Rodríguez, L. CEIGRAM-Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSIAAB, 28040, Madrid, Spain | Gabaldon Leal, C. IFAPA-Centro Alameda del Obispo, Junta de Andalucía, P.O. Box 3092, 14080, Córdoba, Spain | Oliveira, J. A. Área de Producción Vegetal, Universidad de Oviedo, EPM, 33600, Mieres, Spain | Lorite, I. J. IFAPA-Centro Alameda del Obispo, Junta de Andalucía, P.O. Box 3092, 14080, Córdoba, Spain | Rodríguez, A. CEIGRAM-Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSIAAB, 28040, Madrid, Spain y University of Castilla-La Mancha, Department of Economic Analysis, Toledo, Spain | Maddonni, Gustavo Angel. IFEVA-CONICET, Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina | Otegui, María Elena. CONICET-INTA, Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
ISSN: 0378-4290.Tipo de material: Artículos y capítulos. Recurso electrónico.Tema(s): HEAT STRESS | MAIZE | CSM-IXIM | CSM-CERES-MAIZE | BETA FUNCTION | Recursos en línea: Haga clic para acceso en línea | LINK AL EDITOR En: Field crops research Vol.214 (2017), p.239-252, tbls., grafs.Resumen: The available evidence suggests that the current increasing trend in global surface temperatures will continue during this century, which will be accompanied by a greater frequency of extreme events. The IPCC has projected that higher temperatures may outscore the known optimal and maximum temperatures for maize. The purpose of this study was to improve the ability of the maize model CSM-IXIM to simulate crop development, growth, and yield under hot conditions, especially with regards to the impact of above-optimal temperatures around anthesis. Field and greenhouse experiments that were performed over three years (2014–2016) using the same short-season hybrid, PR37N01 (FAO 300), provided the data for this work. Maize was sown at a target population density of 5 plants m−2 on two sowing dates in 2014 and 2015 and on one in 2016 at three locations in Spain (northern, central, and southern Spain) with a well-defined thermal gradient. The same hybrid was also sown in two greenhouse chambers with daytime target temperatures of approximately 25 and above 35 °C. During the nighttime, the temperature in both chambers was allowed to equilibrate with the outside temperature. The greenhouse treatments consisted of moving 18 plants at selected phenological stages (V4, V9, anthesis, lag phase, early grain filling) from the cool chamber to the hot chamber over a week and then returning the plants back to the cool chamber. An additional control treatment remained in the cool chamber all season, and in 2015 and 2016, one treatment remained permanently in the hot chamber. Two maize models in the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) V4.6 were compared, namely CERES and IXIM. The IXIM version included additional components that were previously developed to improve the crop N simulation and to incorporate the anthesis-silking interval (ASI). A new thermal time calculation, a heat stress index, the impact of pollen-sterilizing temperatures, and the explicit simulation of male and female flowering as affected by the daily heat conditions were added to IXIM. The phenology simulation in field experiments by IXIM improved substantially. The RMSE for silking and maturity in CERES were 7.9 and 13.7 days, decreasing in IXIM to 2.8 and 7.3 days, respectively. Similarly, the estimated kernel numbers, kernel weight, grain yield and final biomass were always closer to the measurements in IXIM than in CERES. The worst simulations were for kernel weight, and for that reason, the differences in grain yield between the models were small (the RMSE in CERES was 1219 kg ha−1 vs. 1082 kg ha−1 in IXIM). The greenhouse results also supported the improved estimations of crop development by IXIM (RMSE of 2.6 days) relative to CERES (7.4 days). The impact of the heat treatments on grain yield was consistently overestimated by CERES, while IXIM captured the general trend. The new IXIM model improved the CERES simulations when elevated temperatures were included in the evaluation data. Additional model testing with measurements from a wider latitudinal range and relevant heat conditions are required.
Etiquetas de esta biblioteca: No hay etiquetas de esta biblioteca para este título. Ingresar para agregar etiquetas.
    valoración media: 0.0 (0 votos)

The available evidence suggests that the current increasing trend in global surface temperatures will continue during this century, which will be accompanied by a greater frequency of extreme events. The IPCC has projected that higher temperatures may outscore the known optimal and maximum temperatures for maize. The purpose of this study was to improve the ability of the maize model CSM-IXIM to simulate crop development, growth, and yield under hot conditions, especially with regards to the impact of above-optimal temperatures around anthesis. Field and greenhouse experiments that were performed over three years (2014–2016) using the same short-season hybrid, PR37N01 (FAO 300), provided the data for this work. Maize was sown at a target population density of 5 plants m−2 on two sowing dates in 2014 and 2015 and on one in 2016 at three locations in Spain (northern, central, and southern Spain) with a well-defined thermal gradient. The same hybrid was also sown in two greenhouse chambers with daytime target temperatures of approximately 25 and above 35 °C.
During the nighttime, the temperature in both chambers was allowed to equilibrate with the outside temperature.
The greenhouse treatments consisted of moving 18 plants at selected phenological stages (V4, V9, anthesis, lag phase, early grain filling) from the cool chamber to the hot chamber over a week and then returning the plants back to the cool chamber. An additional control treatment remained in the cool chamber all season, and in 2015 and 2016, one treatment remained permanently in the hot chamber. Two maize models in the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) V4.6 were compared, namely CERES and IXIM. The IXIM version included additional components that were previously developed to improve the crop N simulation and to incorporate the anthesis-silking interval (ASI). A new thermal time calculation, a heat stress index, the impact of pollen-sterilizing temperatures, and the explicit simulation of male and female flowering as affected by the daily heat conditions were added to IXIM. The phenology simulation in field experiments by IXIM improved substantially.
The RMSE for silking and maturity in CERES were 7.9 and 13.7 days, decreasing in IXIM to 2.8 and 7.3 days, respectively. Similarly, the estimated kernel numbers, kernel weight, grain yield and final biomass were always closer to the measurements in IXIM than in CERES. The worst simulations were for kernel weight, and for that reason, the differences in grain yield between the models were small (the RMSE in CERES was 1219 kg ha−1 vs. 1082 kg ha−1 in IXIM). The greenhouse results also supported the improved estimations of crop development by IXIM (RMSE of 2.6 days) relative to CERES (7.4 days). The impact of the heat treatments on grain yield was consistently overestimated by CERES, while IXIM captured the general trend. The new IXIM model improved the CERES simulations when elevated temperatures were included in the evaluation data.
Additional model testing with measurements from a wider latitudinal range and relevant heat conditions are required.

No hay comentarios para este ítem.

Ingresar a su cuenta para colocar un comentario.

Av. San Martín 4453 - 1417 – CABA – Argentina.
Sala de lectura de Planta Baja: bibliote@agro.uba.ar (54 11) 5287-0013
Referencia: referen@agro.uba.ar (54 11) 5287-0418
Hemeroteca: hemerote@agro.uba.ar (54 11) 5287-0218