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Satellite images as a tool to identify accelerated atrazine mineralization in soils

Colaborador(es): Hang, Susana Beatriz. Universidad Nacional de Córdoba. Facultad Ciencias Agropecuarias. Departamento de Recursos Naturales. Córdoba, Argentina | Mercuri, Pablo Alberto. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Hurlingham, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Buenos Aires, Argentina | Díaz Zorita, Martín. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Agronomía. Instituto de Investigaciones Fisiológicas y Ecológicas Vinculadas a la Agricultura (IFEVA). Buenos Aires, Argentina. CONICET – Universidad de Buenos Aires. Instituto de Investigaciones Fisiológicas y Ecológicas Vinculadas a la Agricultura (IFEVA). Buenos Aires, Argentina. Merck Crop Bioscience Argentina. Pilar, Buenos Aires, Argentina | Havrylenko, Sofía. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Hurlingham, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Buenos Aires, Argentina | Barriuso, Enrique. National Institute of Agronomical Research, Environment and Arable Crops.Thiverval-Grignon, France.
ISSN: 0261-2194.Tipo de material: Artículos y capítulos. Recurso electrónico.Tema(s): ATRAZINE EFFICIENCY | ACCELERATED ATRAZINE MINERALIZATION | SATELLITE IMAGERY | MAIZE CROP | ATRAZINE NON-EXTRACTABLE RESIDUES | Recursos en línea: Haga clic para acceso en línea | LINK AL EDITOR En: Crop Protection vol.30, no.6 (2011), p.663-670, grafs., tbls.Resumen: Microflora adaptation to atrazine (6-chloro-N2-ethyl-N4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) mineralization due to its frequent use on the same soil has been clearly demonstrated. Studies show accelerated herbicide mineralization with mineralization percentages reaching up to 60 per cent of the applied atrazine in a few days, which results in decreased weed control efficiency. Frequently, atrazine doses are increased to circumvent low efficiency, although this solution does not solve accelerated atrazine mineralization. The identification of soils with accelerated atrazine mineralization to guide selection of adequate management strategies and achieve good atrazine performance in adapted soils is critical. The present research assessed accelerated atrazine mineralization recognition on the basis of previous years maize (Zea mays L.) cropping as an indicator of atrazine use identified using satellite images. Three years of crop sequences were monitored by visual interpretation of Landsat satellite images. Bands 3, 4, and 5 were evaluated and corresponded, respectively, to red, near infrared, and mid - infrared. Vegetation was distinguished by selecting the R:4 G:5 B:3 color composition. Prior to assessment, atrazine behavior was evaluated in soils with high (SH) and low (SL) atrazine mineralization capacity. 14C-ring-labeled atrazine distribution between extractable, non-extractable, and mineralized soil culture fractions was subject to monitoring. Atrazine mineralization was determined by soil laboratory incubation. These included some soils of known past use and others with history predicted by satellite imagery. Topsoil (0e10 cm) samples were extracted according to two soil sampling strategies: Type A sampling (designated site A) consisted of 25 topsoil samples with known history, and type B sampling (designated site B) comprised 20 topsoil samples from history inferred via satellite imagery. Atrazine mineralization was monitored for 23 days under laboratory conditions. Soil 14C applied mineralization ranged from 0.3e73.0 per cent and 0.2e30.0 per cent in sites A and B, respectively. These broad ranges were closely related to maize presence/absence in the crop rotation at both sites. Following three straight growing seasons of maize, atrazine mineralization capacity reached a plateau in site A soils, with similar results observed in site B soils. This pattern suggests that satellite image information will be of utility to soil managers in selecting strategies to improve atrazine efficiency, including simultaneous fertilization, post - emergence atrazine applications, and choice of maize hybrids based on canopy architecture and weed competitiveness.
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Microflora adaptation to atrazine (6-chloro-N2-ethyl-N4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) mineralization due to its frequent use on the same soil has been clearly demonstrated.
Studies show accelerated herbicide mineralization with mineralization percentages reaching up to 60 per cent of the applied atrazine in a few days, which results in decreased weed control efficiency. Frequently, atrazine doses are increased to circumvent low efficiency, although this solution does not solve accelerated atrazine mineralization.
The identification of soils with accelerated atrazine mineralization to guide selection of adequate management strategies and achieve good atrazine performance in adapted soils is critical.
The present research assessed accelerated atrazine mineralization recognition on the basis of previous years maize (Zea mays L.) cropping as an indicator of atrazine use identified using satellite images.
Three years of crop sequences were monitored by visual interpretation of Landsat satellite images. Bands 3, 4, and 5 were evaluated and corresponded, respectively, to red, near infrared, and mid - infrared.
Vegetation was distinguished by selecting the R:4 G:5 B:3 color composition.
Prior to assessment, atrazine behavior was evaluated in soils with high (SH) and low (SL) atrazine mineralization capacity. 14C-ring-labeled atrazine distribution between extractable, non-extractable, and mineralized soil culture fractions was subject to monitoring.
Atrazine mineralization was determined by soil laboratory incubation.
These included some soils of known past use and others with history predicted by satellite imagery. Topsoil (0e10 cm) samples were extracted according to two soil sampling strategies: Type A sampling (designated site A) consisted of 25 topsoil samples with known history, and type B sampling (designated site B) comprised 20 topsoil samples from history inferred via satellite imagery.
Atrazine mineralization was monitored for 23 days under laboratory conditions.
Soil 14C applied mineralization ranged from 0.3e73.0 per cent and 0.2e30.0 per cent in sites A and B, respectively.
These broad ranges were closely related to maize presence/absence in the crop rotation at both sites.
Following three straight growing seasons of maize, atrazine mineralization capacity reached a plateau in site A soils, with similar results observed in site B soils.
This pattern suggests that satellite image information will be of utility to soil managers in selecting strategies to improve atrazine efficiency, including simultaneous fertilization,
post - emergence atrazine applications, and choice of maize hybrids based on canopy architecture and weed competitiveness.

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