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Phytochrome A increases tolerance to high evaporative demand

Por: Auge, G. A.
Colaborador(es): Rugnone, M. L | Cortés, L. E | González, C. V | Zarlavsky, G | Boccalandro, H. E | Sánchez, R. A.
ISSN: 0031-9317.Tipo de material: Artículos y capítulos. Recurso electrónico.Tema(s): PHYTOCHROME A | WATER | ACCLIMATIZATION | COMPARATIVE STUDY | EVAPOTRANSPIRATION | GENETIC VARIABILITY | GENETICS | GENOTYPE | GROWTH, DEVELOPMENT AND AGING | METABOLISM | PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS | PHYSIOLOGY | PLANT LEAF | PLANT ROOT | PLANT STEM | PLANT STOMA | SPECIES DIFFERENCE | SUNLIGHT | TOMATO | TRANSPORT AT THE CELLULAR LEVEL | XYLEM | ACCLIMATIZATION | BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT | GENETIC VARIATION | PHYTOCHROME A | PLANT LEAVES | PLANT ROOTS | PLANT STEMS | PLANT STOMATA | PLANT TRANSPIRATION | SPECIES SPECIFICITY | STRESS, PHYSIOLOGICAL | LYCOPERSICON ESCULENTUM | Recursos en línea: Haga clic para acceso en línea | LINK AL EDITOR. En: Physiologia Plantarum Vol. 146, no. 2 (2012) 228-235Resumen: Stresses resulting from high transpiration demand induce adjustments in plants that lead to reductions of water loss. These adjustments, including changes in water absorption, transport and/or loss by transpiration, are crucial to normal plant development. Tomato wild type [WT] and phytochrome A [phyA]-mutant plants, fri1-1, were exposed to conditions of either low or high transpiration demand and several morphological and physiological changes were measured during stress conditions. Mutant plants rapidly wilted compared to WT plants after exposure to high evaporative demand. Root size and hydraulic conductivity did not show significant differences between genotypes, suggesting that water absorption and transport through this organ could not explain the observed phenotype. Moreover, stomatal density was similar between genotypes, whereas transpiration and stomatal conductance were both lower in mutant than in WT plants. This was accompanied by a lower stem-specific hydraulic conductivity in mutant plants, which was associated to lower xylem vessel number and transversal area in fri1-1 plants, producing a reduction in water supply to the leaves, which rapidly wilted under high evaporative demand. PhyA signaling might facilitate the adjustment to environments differing widely in water evaporative demand in part through the modulation of xylem dimensions.
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Stresses resulting from high transpiration demand induce adjustments in plants that lead to reductions of water loss. These adjustments, including changes in water absorption, transport and/or loss by transpiration, are crucial to normal plant development. Tomato wild type [WT] and phytochrome A [phyA]-mutant plants, fri1-1, were exposed to conditions of either low or high transpiration demand and several morphological and physiological changes were measured during stress conditions. Mutant plants rapidly wilted compared to WT plants after exposure to high evaporative demand. Root size and hydraulic conductivity did not show significant differences between genotypes, suggesting that water absorption and transport through this organ could not explain the observed phenotype. Moreover, stomatal density was similar between genotypes, whereas transpiration and stomatal conductance were both lower in mutant than in WT plants. This was accompanied by a lower stem-specific hydraulic conductivity in mutant plants, which was associated to lower xylem vessel number and transversal area in fri1-1 plants, producing a reduction in water supply to the leaves, which rapidly wilted under high evaporative demand. PhyA signaling might facilitate the adjustment to environments differing widely in water evaporative demand in part through the modulation of xylem dimensions.

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