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Can temporal and spatial NDVI predict regional bird-species richness?

Por: Nieto, Sebastián.
Colaborador(es): Flombaum, Pedro | Garbulsky, Martín Fabio.
ISSN: 2351-9894.Tipo de material: Artículos y capítulos. Recurso electrónico.Tema(s): TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL VARIABILITY | PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY | NATIONAL PARK NETWORK | BASELINE CONDITIONS | AVES | Recursos en línea: Haga clic para acceso en línea | LINK AL EDITOR. En: Global Ecology and Conservation vol.3 (2015), p.729-735Resumen: Understanding the distribution of the species and its controls over biogeographic scales is still a major challenge in ecology. National Park Networks provide an opportunity to assess the relationship between ecosystem functioning and biodiversity in areas with low human impacts. We tested the productivity-biodiversity hypothesis which states that the number of species increases with the available energy, and the variability-biodiversity hypothesis which states that the number of species increases with the diversity of habitats. The available energy and habitat heterogeneity estimated by the normalized difference vegetation index [NDVI] was shown as a good predictor of bird-species richness for a diverse set of biomes in previously published studies. However, there is not a universal relationship between NDVI and bird-species richness. Here we tested if the NDVI can predict bird species richness in areas with low human impact in Argentina. Using a dataset from the National Park Network of Argentina we found that the best predictor of bird species richness was the minimum value of NDVI per year which explained 75 percent of total variability. The inclusion of the spatial heterogeneity of NDVI improved the explanation power to 80 percent. Minimum NDVI was highly correlated with precipitation and winter temperature. Our analysis provides a tool for assessing bird-species richness at scales on which land-use planning practitioners make their decisions for Southern South America.
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Understanding the distribution of the species and its controls over biogeographic scales is still a major challenge in ecology. National Park Networks provide an opportunity to assess the relationship between ecosystem functioning and biodiversity in areas with low human impacts. We tested the productivity-biodiversity hypothesis which states that the number of species increases with the available energy, and the variability-biodiversity hypothesis which states that the number of species increases with the diversity of habitats. The available energy and habitat heterogeneity estimated by the normalized difference vegetation index [NDVI] was shown as a good predictor of bird-species richness for a diverse set of biomes in previously published studies. However, there is not a universal relationship between NDVI and bird-species richness. Here we tested if the NDVI can predict bird species richness in areas with low human impact in Argentina. Using a dataset from the National Park Network of Argentina we found that the best predictor of bird species richness was the minimum value of NDVI per year which explained 75 percent of total variability. The inclusion of the spatial heterogeneity of NDVI improved the explanation power to 80 percent. Minimum NDVI was highly correlated with precipitation and winter temperature. Our analysis provides a tool for assessing bird-species richness at scales on which land-use planning practitioners make their decisions for Southern South America.

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