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Nonlinear responses in salt marsh functioning to increased nitrogen addition

Por: Vivanco, Lucía.
Colaborador(es): Irvine, Irina C | Martiny, Jennifer B. H.
ISSN: 0012-9658.Tipo de material: Artículos y capítulos. Recurso electrónico.Tema(s): | UNITED STATES | TIJUANA RIVER ESTUARY | TIDAL WETLANDS | SEDIMENT PROPERTY | SALTMARSH | SALICORNIA VIRGINICA | SALICORNIA | PICKLEWEED | NITROGEN | MORRO BAY ESTUARY | MORRO BAY | METHANE FLUX | METHANE | EUTROPHICATION | ECOSYSTEM SERVICES | ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION | ECOLOGICAL THRESHOLDS | DICOTYLEDON | COASTAL WETLAND | COASTAL EUTROPHICATION | CARPINTERIA SALT MARSH | CARBON SEQUESTRATION | CALIFORNIA | ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCE | Recursos en línea: Haga clic para acceso en línea | LINK AL EDITOR. En: Ecology vol. 96, no. 4 (2015), p.936-947Resumen: Salt marshes provide storm protection to shorelines, sequester carbon [C], and mitigate coastal eutrophication. These valuable coastal ecosystems are confronted with increasing nitrogen [N] inputs from anthropogenic sources, such as agricultural runoff, wastewater, and atmospheric deposition. To inform predictions of salt marsh functioning and sustainability in the future, we characterized the response of a variety of plant, microbial, and sediment responses to a seven-level gradient of N addition in three Californian salt marshes after 7 and 14 months of N addition. The marshes showed variable responses to the experimental N gradient that can be grouped as neutral [root biomass, sediment respiration, potential carbon mineralization, and potential net nitrification], linear [increasing methane flux, decreasing potential net N mineralization, and increasing sediment inorganic N], and nonlinear [saturating aboveground plant biomass and leaf N content, and exponentially increasing sediment inorganic and organic N]. The three salt marshes showed quantitative differences in most ecosystem properties and processes rates; however, the form of the response curves to N addition were generally consistent across the three marshes, indicating that the responses observed may be applicable to other marshes in the region. Only for sediment properties [inorganic and organic N pool] did the shape of the response differ significantly between marshes. Overall, the study suggests salt marshes are limited in their ability to sequester C and N with future increases in N, even without further losses in marsh area.
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Salt marshes provide storm protection to shorelines, sequester carbon [C], and mitigate coastal eutrophication. These valuable coastal ecosystems are confronted with increasing nitrogen [N] inputs from anthropogenic sources, such as agricultural runoff, wastewater, and atmospheric deposition. To inform predictions of salt marsh functioning and sustainability in the future, we characterized the response of a variety of plant, microbial, and sediment responses to a seven-level gradient of N addition in three Californian salt marshes after 7 and 14 months of N addition. The marshes showed variable responses to the experimental N gradient that can be grouped as neutral [root biomass, sediment respiration, potential carbon mineralization, and potential net nitrification], linear [increasing methane flux, decreasing potential net N mineralization, and increasing sediment inorganic N], and nonlinear [saturating aboveground plant biomass and leaf N content, and exponentially increasing sediment inorganic and organic N]. The three salt marshes showed quantitative differences in most ecosystem properties and processes rates; however, the form of the response curves to N addition were generally consistent across the three marshes, indicating that the responses observed may be applicable to other marshes in the region. Only for sediment properties [inorganic and organic N pool] did the shape of the response differ significantly between marshes. Overall, the study suggests salt marshes are limited in their ability to sequester C and N with future increases in N, even without further losses in marsh area.

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